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The 6 Types of Players in an Escape Room

The key to succeeding in any escape room is not to lock yourself in a room of brainiacs, but to assemble a diverse team of thinkers with different techniques, quirks, and strengths. Listed below are the 6 main types that we see.


Which one are you?

The Leader

Almost always your most extroverted friend, this person tends to quickly and naturally arise as a team captain, overseeing the game as a project manager. The Leader doesn’t often get involved in the details of individual puzzles, but rather sees the game in the bigger picture: organizing workflow, keeping time, and delegating tasks. They want glory not for themselves, but for the whole team. Leaders have amazing communication skills, providing constructive advice, posing suggestions, and dealing positive cheer whenever something is accomplished, no matter how small. A room full of leaders can be bad, but a room without one is much, much worse. Call your trusted mom-friend, your most social butterfly, or whoever you consider the CEO of herding cats. You're going to either need a leader, or become one.

The Scribe

Most escape rooms offer a notepad, a chalkboard, or a dry erase board for guests to keep track of information they deem important. The Scribe is a person who truly understands the value of this ledger. This role is usually reserved for bookkeepers, accountants, diary queens and whoever is still updating their LiveJournal account. What’s that? We need a 4 digit code? Well thank god Derek wrote down “1849” after hearing it maybe, once? The Scribe always keeps the history, lest it be forgotten for it is he who forgets history who is doomed to repeat it...



The Bookworm

Where there’s a writer, there’s a reader. Sometimes also inhibiting The Scribe role, The Bookworm makes a point to read and reread riddles, poems, ciphers, and even barcodes accidentally left behind from the manufacturer. Whatever they read, they will read into. Can they read 13 chapters of a prop book in one hour? Maybe. Will they? Probably, unless you stop them. The Bookworm isn’t always silent, either. A gifted reader is essential for reading aloud to the group in a clear way that allows for groupthink. Wherever there’s a player that sees a long passage and exclaims, “I’m not readin’ that,” The Bookworm is there to announce, “I will.



The Seeker

You can’t solve any puzzles until you find them. It’s as simple as that. The Seeker is most often the most ambitious player at the beginning of the game. At the start of the timer, they will dart around the room, on a mission to uncover whatever is hidden. They will most certainly be the first to announce finding a clue that corresponds to a key starting place in the room, perhaps in a place that was initially looked over! For escape rooms which allow younger players, the best Seekers are often kids, or at least those who don’t mind bending down to check underneath a table or seat. Get your friend with the strongest knees and best night vision. If they can, get them to drive you to your escape room booking, too. It might be the best way to ensure you find the building.



The Logician

Calling all Virgos, all mathletes, and all social media sleuths… The escape room is waiting. If this isn’t you, the Logician is likely the person who roped you into participating with them in your first escape room experience. They delve headfirst into all logic puzzles, patterns, or math. This person is also known as the “Know-It-All” or “The Brain” and you can roll your eyes all you want, but you will thank them later! Sure, they understand morse code without any military background, and yes, they can complete a crossword puzzle without any help, but Logicians are essential for building all the excitement around problem-solving! They will be the first to explain to you what a “Pigpen Cipher” is, and proudest when you solve your first puzzle without them.

The Comedic Relief

Every great action movie requires a… “lovable fool” to deliver some much needed relief to all the drama. The Comedic Relief doesn’t attempt to butt-in to any deciphering or logical puzzles, but rather make the most of the experience by getting immersed in the theme, assuming a character role, and attempting to redirect players back into the fun, should things get too complicated. Getting people together to solve problems under a time limit can lead to disagreements. Disagreements waste time. Wasting time leads to an even more stressful disagreement. Get yourself a Chaotic Good, a lovable fool, a class clown if you will. They'll make sure to find whatever costume is available and wear it, but don't worry- they've got one for you, too. This player will remind everyone that you are, after all, there to play.


Which role are you? Share this article with your friends to let them know whether you're the brains of the operation or an expert goofball.


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